-- MASONRY --

Office:   828.484.9713  --  Cell:   828.712.6416

E-mail:  sgt179@yahoo.com -- Bill Sargent

Chimney

Firebox

Fireplace

BUILD NEW or REPAIR

 

Masonry:  It is commonly used for the walls of buildings, retaining walls and buildings. Brick and concrete block are the most common types of masonry in use in industrialized nations and may be either weight-bearing or a veneer. Concrete blocks, especially those with hollow cores, offer various possibilities in masonry construction. They generally provide great compression strength, and are best suited to structures with light transverse loading when the cores remain unfilled. Filling some or all of the cores with concrete or concrete with steel reinforcement (typically re-bar) offers much greater tensile and lateral strength to structures.

 

Advantages

  • The use of material such as bricks and stones can increase the thermal mass of a building and can protect the building from fire.
  • Most types of masonry typically will not require painting and so can provide a structure with reduced life-cycle costs.
  • Masonry is non-combustible product.
  • Masonry walls are more resistant to projectiles, such as debris from hurricanes or tornadoes.
  • Masonry structures built in compression preferably with lime mortar can have a useful life of more than 500 years as compared to 30 to 100 for structures of steel or reinforced concrete.[citation needed]
  • Bricks are fire resisting material
 

Disadvantages

  • Extreme weather, under certain circumstances, can cause degradation of masonry wall surfaces due to frost damage.
  • Masonry tends to be heavy and must be built upon a strong foundation, such as reinforced concrete, to avoid settling and cracking.
  • Other than concrete, masonry construction does not lend itself well to mechanization, and requires more skilled labor than stick-framing.
  • Masonry consists of loose components and has a low tolerance to oscillation as compared to other materials such as reinforced concrete, plastics, wood, or metals.
 

Structural limitations

Masonry has high compressive strength under vertical loads but has low tensile strength (against twisting or stretching) unless reinforced. The tensile strength of masonry walls can be increased by thickening the wall, or by building masonry piers (vertical columns or ribs) at intervals. Where practical, steel reinforcements such as re-bar can be added.

Stone-Brick-Concrete Siding

Go to Masonry to see a variety of examples of our work, make sure you look at the Cool Place, a home with numerous specialty and artistic works created by Bill and the crew.  Stone and masonry veneer is sometimes considered siding, are varied and can accommodate a variety of styles—from formal to rustic. Though masonry can be painted or tinted to match many color palettes, it is most suited to neutral earth tones, and coatings such as roughcast and pebbeldash. Masonry has excellent durability (over 100 years), and minimal maintenance is required.